News

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: July 2016    Friday, July 15, 2016
The presidential campaign is in full swing with candidates and political parties negotiating party platforms, frequent murmurings about possible vice presidential candidates, and party conventions starting in days. As part of Kaiser’s ongoing analysis of the role of health care issues in the political debate, the July Kaiser Health Tracking Poll examines the role that health care may play in the 2016 presidential election, how important health care is to voters, what health care issues voters would most like to hear the candidates discuss, and which party and candidates voters feel most closely aligned with on health care issues. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 15-21, 2016 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,212 adults age 18 or older, including 786 cell phone interviews.

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: June 2016    Thursday, June 30, 2016
The June Kaiser Health Tracking Poll examines the role of the major health policy news stories in the current news and political environment. In addition, it provides an in-depth analysis of two of the biggest health policy stories: the Zika virus outbreak and the rising costs of ACA health insurance premiums. This month’s tracking poll finds a large majority of Americans closely following news stories about the attack at a LGBT night club in Orlando, Florida (85 percent), the 2016 presidential campaigns (80 percent), and conflicts involving ISIS and other Islamic militant groups (79 percent). The top health stories during the month of June, both closely followed by about six in ten Americans, are the rising costs of health insurance premiums (61 percent) and the Zika virus outbreak (57 percent). In addition, 55 percent of Americans report following news about the ongoing opioid epidemic closely, similar to the share who report closely following outrage over the sentencing in a Stanford sexual assault case (54 percent). Finally, during the summer travel season, nearly half of Americans report closely following news about the long security lines at the country’s airports (47 percent). The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 15-21, 2016 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,201 adults age 18 or older, including 781 cell phone interviews.

Pew Global: As Obama Years Draw to Close, President and U.S. Seen Favorably in Europe and Asia    Wednesday, June 29, 2016
As he nears the end of his presidency, Barack Obama continues to enjoy a broad degree of international popularity. A new Pew Research Center survey conducted in 10 European nations, four major Asia-Pacific countries, Canada and the United States finds that half or more of those polled in 15 of 16 countries express confidence in the American leader. Although he has not been universally praised by global publics throughout his two terms in office, previous Pew Research Center surveys have found higher international ratings for Obama than for his predecessor, George W. Bush. During the Bush era, opposition to U.S. foreign policy and rising anti-Americanism were widespread in many regions of the world, but Obama’s election in November 2008 led to a significant improvement in America’s global image. The shift was especially dramatic in Western Europe, where assessments of Bush were grim, but subsequent views of Obama have been remarkably positive. Results for the survey are based on telephone and face-to-face interviews conducted under the direction of Princeton Survey Research Associates International and TNS BMRB.

CreditCards.com Poll: Paper bank statements remain popular    Wednesday, June 22, 2016
When it comes to financial statements, paper's still popular. Even in an increasingly digital world, even after years of banks pushing consumers toward e-statements with rewards or fees, more than half of consumers continue to have paper financial statements delivered by mail, says a new CreditCards.com national poll. Fifty-four percent of American adults say they get a credit card or checking account paper statement by mail. Age is a huge factor in whether people prefer paper or digital financial statements. Among young millennials age 18-25, for example, just 6 percent say they get monthly credit card statement by mail. The oldest consumers, 71 and older, are six times more likely to get paper: 36 percent say they get paper credit card statements. The numbers are similar for checking and debit card accounts. For those who prefer paper, loyalty is fierce. Nearly half (46 percent) say they would not switch even if they were charged extra for mailed statements. A $5 account credit and and a 10 percent discount coupon wouldn't be enough inducement for most, either (see chart). Only a $50 account credit would be enough to tip a bare majority (52 percent) into switching. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 2-5, 2016 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

CreditCards.com Poll: 4 in 10 co-signers lose money    Sunday, June 05, 2016
Everyone needs a helping hand sometimes, but if a credit-challenged friend or family member asks you to co-sign a loan or credit card, there's a fair chance you’re going to get burned. A new CreditCards.com survey of 2,003 U.S. adults revealed the negative results from co-signed loans gone wrong. 38 percent of co-signers had to pay some or all of the loan or credit card bill because the primary borrower did not. 28 percent experienced a drop in their credit score because the person they co-signed for paid late or not at all. 26 percent of respondents said the co-signing experience damaged the relationship with the person they co-signed for. Overall, the poll found, 1 in 6 U.S. adults say they have co-signed a loan or credit card for someone else. The most-common scenario: A co-signer older than 50, helping a child or stepchild by co-signing an auto loan. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted April 14-17 and May 5-8, 2016 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,003 adults age 18 or older, including 388 cosigners.

InsuranceQuotes Study Shows Millennials Skip Renters Insurance, Putting Finances At Risk    Thursday, May 19, 2016
Millennials are most likely to rent their homes but least likely to be covered by renters insurance, a new survey shows. And while buying coverage won't cost a lot, not having it could. Sixty-six percent of 18- to 29-year-olds rent, compared with just 37 percent of consumers overall. But less than one-third of these young renters have renters insurance, according to an April 2016 survey for insuranceQuotes.com carried out by Princeton Survey Research Associates International. However, it isn't lack of money that's keeping renters 18 to 29 from getting coverage. Consumers in this age group are most likely (59 percent) to say cost isn't the reason they lack insurance. Instead, 61 percent of millennial renters cite living in a secure property as an important reason they decided to skip coverage, while 43 percent said they don't have enough property to insure, and 41 percent said they don't understand how the product works. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted April 7-10, 2016 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

CreditCards.com Poll: 8 in 10 Americans pay for summer vacation with savings    Wednesday, May 18, 2016
When it comes to their summer vacations this year, Americans aren’t planning to break the bank, according to a new CreditCards.com poll. In fact, they’re feeling downright frugal. More than half of those surveyed – 54 percent – said they aren’t planning to take a summer vacation at all. Of those who are, about 8 in 10 plan to pay for at least part of their vacations using money they’ve saved, the survey found. Only 15 percent said they were going to put their vacations on their credit cards. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted May 5-8, 2016 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

Bankrate Money Pulse: We wondered if a lousy credit score is a romantic turn-off, and guess what we found    Friday, April 29, 2016
A new Bankrate survey found nearly 4 in 10 adults say knowing someone's credit score would affect their willingness to date that person. It's a more important factor for women: 43% of women say learning a person's score would have either a major or minor impact on their dating interest, while just 32% of men say the same, according to the latest Bankrate Money Pulse survey. Looking at education levels, 47% of college graduates say knowing a credit score would have either a major or minor impact, versus just 29% of those with a high school education or less. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted April 14-17, 2016 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: April 2016    Thursday, April 28, 2016
With news about the 2016 Presidential election topping national news, the April Tracking survey asks which issues- in their own words- American voters most want to hear candidates discuss in the campaign. Health care is one of the top four issues mentioned by voters, but half as many cite health care as mention the economy and jobs. Nearly one-third of registered voters (30 percent), regardless of party, would like candidates to focus on the economy and jobs. This is followed by national security (21 percent) and immigration (17 percent). Health care (15 percent) ranks fourth for voters this election cycle, compared to 2012 when it ranked second behind the economy and jobs. Social issues such as race relations and same-sex marriage (10 percent), education (8 percent), and foreign policy (8 percent) are mentioned by about one in ten Americans. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted April 12-19, 2016 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,201 adults age 18 or older, including 781 cell phone interviews.

Pew Internet, Science, and Technology: Libraries and Learning    Thursday, April 07, 2016
Most Americans believe libraries do a decent job of serving the education and learning needs of their communities and their own families. A new survey by Pew Research Center shows that 76% of adults say libraries serve the learning and educational needs of their communities either “very well” (37%) or “pretty well” (39%). Further, 71% say libraries serve their own personal needs and the needs of their families “very well” or “pretty well.” As a rule, libraries’ performance in learning arenas gets better marks from women, blacks, Hispanics, those in lower-income households, and those ages 30 and older. At the same time, many do not know that libraries offer learning-related programs and materials such as e-books, career and job resources, and high school certification courses. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 13 - November 15, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,752 adults age 18 or older, including 1,789 cell phone interviews.

CreditCards Poll: 70 percent of consumers now have EMV chip cards    Wednesday, April 06, 2016
Most U.S. consumers are now armed with smart chip cards and would be happy to use them – if only they could. A new nationally representative telephone survey commissioned by CreditCards.com found 70 percent of U.S. credit cardholders now carry an EMV chip card. Issuance of cards bearing the fraud-fighting electronic chips has surged dramatically since Oct. 1, 2015. That's when liability for some fraud shifted from card issuers to merchants that can't accept the new cards. When you compare data from the new poll to a similar one CreditCards.com conducted in September 2015 and extrapolate it across the U.S. population, it means approximately 30 million Americans have received their first EMV card in the past six months.The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted April 7-10, 2016 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 932 credit cardholders


Bankrate Poll: Bankrate survey: Many homeowners are ready to remodel    Tuesday, April 05, 2016
In August 2015, Michelle Arnold and her fiance bought their first home, a 1955 ranch-style house. Then they set out to make it their own. "Going in, we definitely knew there was some extensive work that needed to be done. But we were up for the challenges," says Arnold, 23, of York, Pennsylvania. Working nights and weekends over 2 months, the couple pulled up carpet, refinished 700 square feet of hardwood floors, gutted the bathroom and put down new flooring in the kitchen, bathroom and hallway. Now, they've just begun another DIY project: Remodeling the basement. Arnold and her future husband, Justin Bull, are among the 28% of U.S. homeowners with plans to remodel, expand or otherwise improve their homes in the next 12 months, according to the latest Bankrate Money Pulse survey. Millennial homeowners are the most likely age group to indicate they have plans to make home improvements. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 17-20, 2016 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

Bankrate Poll: Credit Scores Are Factor When Dating    Tuesday, April 05, 2016
A new Bankrate survey found nearly 4 in 10 adults say knowing someone's credit score would affect their willingness to date that person. It's a more important factor for women: 43% of women say learning a person's score would have either a major or minor impact on their dating interest, while just 32% of men say the same, according to the latest Bankrate Money Pulse survey. Looking at education levels, 47% of college graduates say knowing a credit score would have either a major or minor impact, versus just 29% of those with a high school education or less. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted April 14-17, 2016 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

The Atlantic: How Perceptions About Opportunity Vary By Race    Thursday, March 10, 2016
Black and white Americans have dramatically different views on whether all children have equal access to the same opportunities. While 77 percent of whites surveyed in an Atlantic Media/Pearson Opportunity Poll released this week think children of color in their neighborhood have access to the same opportunities as white children, just 41 percent of African Americans agree. More than 70 percent of Latinos and Asians polled agree with the statement, making the figure from black respondents the outlier, albeit not necessarily a surprising one. Across a range of markers, from educational attainment to salary to health, black Americans lag behind white Americans. Black children are more likely to attend high-poverty schools with fewer resources and less-qualified teachers. Just 41 percent of blacks surveyed think the schooling children in their neighborhood receive is adequately preparing them for college work, compared with about half of whites, 61 percent of Latinos, and 63 percent of Asians. So it’s not necessarily surprising that African American respondents do not think children of color have the same opportunities as white children. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 10-25, 2016 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,276 adults age 18 or older, including 825 cell phone interviews.

The Atlantic: The Ethnic Groups That Still Believe in the American Dream    Wednesday, March 09, 2016
Despite the narrative, very popular in this election cycle, that Americans are having trouble getting ahead, Hispanics and Asians in the United States still believe in the basic premise of the American Dream—that anyone who works hard still has a fair chance to succeed and live a comfortable life. This optimism is felt by over half of Hispanic and Asian respondents in an Atlantic Media/Pearson Opportunity Poll released on Tuesday. Most white and black respondents, however, said it is difficult for the average person to get ahead in an economy that mostly rewards the rich. Across all of the demographic groups polled, just 44 percent of respondents said that hard work can lead to a fair shot at success. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 10-25, 2016 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,276 adults age 18 or older, including 825 cell phone interviews.

CreditCards Poll: Most who ask get late fees waived, rates reduced    Tuesday, March 08, 2016
Want to get your credit card late fee waived or your interest rate lowered? All you have to do is ask, according to a new survey by CreditCards.com. The survey of 981 credit card holders in the U.S. found that almost 9 out of 10 (89 percent) who asked their credit card issuers to reverse a late fee had their request granted. Of those who asked for an interest rate reduction, more than three out of four (78 percent) were successful. Given the success rates, everyone should be asking for those perks. Yet the survey found that only a small number of credit card customers – about 1 in 5 – has made each type of request. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 4-7 & 18-21, 2016 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,495 adults age 18 or older, including 981 credit cardholders.

The Atlantic: What Do Americans Believe Will Help Them Get Ahead?    Tuesday, March 08, 2016
Like many Americans, Monica Hathcoat is convinced she could find a better paying and more stable job if she completed her college degree. With about one year of classes behind her, Hathcoat, who lives in Coweta, Oklahoma, works part-time as a distributor for a company that sells nutritional and weight-loss supplements. “Whenever you go and apply for a job, for me, I can’t say I graduated with any kind of degree through a college, not even a community college, so … most companies would not hire me at this moment,” says Hathcoat, 26. “If I had that higher education, just the name itself, that I have an associate’s degree or master’s degree or any kind of degree, I think someone would be more likely to hire me, and I think I could get a more stable paying job.” Beyond the economic opportunity, she says, she’s convinced completing her degree would help her develop personally because “I didn’t get…the quality of education from my high school that I should have.” The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 10-25, 2016 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,276 adults age 18 or older, including 825 cell phone interviews.

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: February 2016    Thursday, February 25, 2016
The February Kaiser Health Tracking Poll asked the public about broad options for changing the health system that are currently being discussed and finds more Americans (36 percent) say policymakers should build on the existing law to improve affordability and access to care than any other option presented.  Sixteen percent say they would like to see the health care law repealed and not replaced, 13 percent say it should be repealed and replaced with a Republican-sponsored alternative, and 24 percent say the U.S. should establish guaranteed universal coverage through a single government plan. As debate continues over the idea of universal coverage through a single government plan, the survey finds the public divided, with half saying they favor the idea and 43 percent saying they oppose it, and some opinions swayed after hearing counterarguments. In addition, majorities of Democrats and independents favor the idea, compared to just 20 percent of Republicans. Most Americans think that if guaranteed universal coverage through a single government plan was put into place, uninsured and low-income people would be better off, but there is little consensus among the public about how it would impact their care personally. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 10-18, 2016 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,202 adults age 18 or older, including 781 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Majority of Public Wants Senate to Act on Obama’s Court Nominee    Monday, February 22, 2016
In the high-stakes battle over replacing Justice Antonin Scalia on the Supreme Court, a majority of Americans (56%) say the Senate should hold hearings and vote on President Obama’s choice to fill the vacancy. About four-in-ten (38%) say the Senate should not hold hearings until the next president selects a court nominee. Most of those who want the Senate to hold off consideration of a Supreme Court nominee say they would not change their minds about this, regardless of whom Obama selects to replace Scalia. About a quarter of the public (26%) favors the Senate delaying action on the court vacancy, and say they would not be swayed from this view no matter whom Obama nominates. Just 10% of the public favors holding off action on the court vacancy, but say they may change their minds, depending on whom Obama nominates. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 18-21, 2016 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,002 adults age 18 or older, including 501 cell phone interviews.

Caring.com: Debunking the "Lonely Old People" Stereotype    Thursday, February 18, 2016
It’s no secret that aging comes with numerous challenges, but it might surprise many to learn that loneliness doesn’t have to be one of them. According to a new study commissioned by Caring.com, it would appear that far fewer Americans aged 65 and older are as lonely as one might assume. The study, conducted by Princeton Survey Research and Associates International in January 2016, asked 628 adults 65 and older how often they feel lonely or isolated from family and friends. According to the survey’s findings, only 6 percent of respondents said they "often" feel lonely, while 16 percent said they feel lonely "sometimes," and a staggering 59 percent said they "never" feel lonely. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 7-10 & 21-24, 2016 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,003 adults age 18 or older, including 1,003 cell phone interviews.

Bankrate Money Pulse:Nearly half of renters are afraid they can't buy    Tuesday, February 09, 2016
More than a third of non-homeowning consumers say the main reason they don't own is that they just don't want to be homeowners yet. That's according to a survey commissioned by Bankrate.com. Nearly half of respondents say they're not homeowners right now because they either can't afford a down payment (29%) or they believe their credit isn't good enough to qualify for a mortgage (16%). "A lot of people make assumptions that they can't afford to buy based on just some perceptions, and many have not taken the step to figure out how mortgage-ready they are," says Marietta Rodriguez, vice president of national homeownership programs at NeighborWorks America in Washington, D.C. Hispanics were the ethnic group most likely to report that their credit is holding them back from homeownership, while the most-cited reason among blacks and whites was they just don't want to own a home yet. The findings also indicate that as respondents' education level increases, they are less likely to report that the reason they don't own is due to credit problems The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 21-24 & 28-31, 2016 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,002 adults age 18 or older, including 1,002 cell phone interviews.

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: January 2016    Thursday, January 28, 2016
Despite the ongoing debate between Republican lawmakers and President Obama on the future of the 2010 health care law, the January Kaiser Health Tracking Poll finds the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is only one of many issues that may impact voting decisions, with nearly a quarter (23 percent) saying it’s extremely important, but only four percent choosing it as the MOST important issue. Across all issues included in the poll, terrorism and the economy/jobs are the top two issues for voters at this point in the election. Across parties, the ACA does not rank higher than fourth in what voters say will be most important. While there has been recent focus on improving the value of health care, those with insurance under 65 years old largely say the health care services they receive are at least a good value for what they pay for them (71 percent). In addition, despite recent attention in the media and among policymakers to narrow networks and limited provider choice, a large majority (87 percent) of the non-elderly with coverage are also satisfied with the choice of doctors available under their plan, and just 12 percent say they have had to change doctors in the past year because their doctor wasn’t covered by their health plan. Overall, most non-elderly Americans with insurance (74 percent) say that health insurance is worth the money it costs, and six in ten (61 percent) say their plan is an “excellent” or “good” value for what they pay for it. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 13-19, 2016 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,204 adults age 18 or older, including 723 cell phone interviews.

CreditCards Survey: 5 in 6 Americans admit to impulse buys    Sunday, January 24, 2016
According to a new CreditCards.com poll, 5 in 6 Americans say they have made impulse buys, most commonly in person, most commonly for ourselves.  While most of the splurges are inexpensive, more than half of poll respondents say they have spent $100 or more on an impulse buy (54 percent) and another 20 percent said they've spent at least $1,000 on impulse. "We aren't rational beings, we rationalize our actions -- especially with money," said Brad Klontz, co-founder of the Financial Psychology Institute and associate professor of economics and finance at Creighton University. Eighty-four percent of poll respondents say they've made an impulse purchase at some time, and 77 percent in the past three months.  Nearly 8 in 10 (79 percent) made most of their impulse purchases in a store. While many of us rely on our mobile devices, only 6 percent made the most spontaneous buys on a smartphone or tablet. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 7-10, 2016 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older, including 503 cell phone interviews.

Bankrate FSI Poll: Financial security increases as hiring strengthens, survey shows    Wednesday, January 20, 2016
Bankrate's Financial Security Index has climbed higher this month amid strong employment data showing the U.S. economy added 292,000 jobs in December. The index, which takes into account Americans' answers to questions about their savings, job security and other factors, is now at 101.5, up from 101.1 in December. That data comes despite economic headwinds from China and other developing nations. "We've seen a lot of consistency, in particular in job security," says Bankrate's chief financial analyst Greg McBride, CFA. "That's really been an area of strength over the last 18 months, underscored by a strong unemployment report in the month of December." Overall, Americans reported being better off than they were a year ago, thanks to a combination of factors that also included higher net worth and an improved overall financial situation. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 7-10, 2016 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older, including 503 cell phone interviews.

Bankrate Poll: How Americans contend with unexpected expenses    Wednesday, January 06, 2016
The washing machine broke, you chipped a tooth and the dog needs to visit a heart specialist. And that was just Tuesday. Unexpected expenses are almost guaranteed to occur, but few Americans are budgeting for them by stashing money in savings each week or month, the latest Money Pulse survey from Bankrate.com has found. "The survey shows that a very significant minority of American households apparently don't have the resources to pay for an unexpected expense of around $1,000," says Stephen Brobeck, executive director of the Consumer Federation of America. Unexpected expenses occur with such frequency that they should be accounted for by budgeting to save money for emergencies. In Bankrate's survey, 4 of 10 respondents or their immediate family ran into a major unexpected expense last year. Just 57% made it out of 2015 financially unscathed. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted December 17-20, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

IndyStar poll: 70% of Hoosiers support LGBT protections    Thursday, December 17, 2015
A new IndyStar poll, conducted with Ball State University, shows Hoosiers support expanding the state civil rights law to include sexual orientation and gender identity, with 50.2 percent in favor and 35.1 percent opposed. Support jumped to about 70 percent when questions were not framed around the term "civil rights," but instead broke down the specific protections that would be provided to gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people under a bill pending in the Indiana General Assembly. The proposal applies to housing, employment, retail businesses and public services. “When you ask something in the abstract, people aren’t quite sure what that means,” said Joseph Losco, director of Ball State's Bowen Center for Public Affairs. “But when you apply it and give specific examples, then it becomes much more clear to them. When people know exactly what that means – it’s providing legal protections to people – that makes it more concrete, more tangible.” The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 30 - December 9, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a sample of 600 Indiana adults age 18 or older, including 240 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Views of Government’s Handling of Terrorism Fall to Post-9/11 Low    Tuesday, December 15, 2015
Following the terrorist attacks in Paris and San Bernardino, Calif., the public’s concerns about terrorism have surged and positive ratings of the government’s handling of terrorism have plummeted. But other attitudes relating to terrorism and security, as well as perceptions of whether Islam is more likely than other religions to encourage violence, have shown far less change. The latest national survey by Pew Research Center finds that since the start of this year, the share of Americans who say the government is doing well in reducing the threat of terrorism has fallen by 26 percentage points – from 72% to 46% – and now stands at its lowest point in the post-9/11 era. Approval of the way Barack Obama is handling the threat of terrorism also has declined, even as his overall job rating (currently 46%) – and his ratings on immigration, the economy and other issues – is little changed. Just 37% approve of the way Obama is handling terrorism while 57% disapprove, the lowest rating of his presidency for this issue. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted December 8-13, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,500 adults age 18 or older, including 975 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Debates Help Fuel Strong Interest in 2016 Campaign    Monday, December 14, 2015
As candidates in both parties prepare for the next round of presidential debates, a new national survey finds that the public is highly engaged by the 2016 campaign. Fully 74% of Americans say they have given a lot or some thought to the candidates, higher than the shares saying this at comparable points in the past two presidential campaigns. The presidential debates clearly have been a hit with the public. Nearly seven-in-ten (69%) say they have watched at least some of the televised debates between the candidates. In December 2007 – the most recent election in which there were contested nominations in both parties – just 43% reported watching any of the debates. The latest national survey by Pew Research Center finds that nearly two-thirds (65%) of those who watched the debates say they have been helpful in learning about the candidates. And about half of debate watchers (51%) say they have found the debates “fun to watch.” The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted December 8-13, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,500 adults age 18 or older, including 975 cell phone interviews.

CreditCards Poll: 1 in 5 Debtors Say They'll Be In Debt Forever    Tuesday, December 08, 2015
As holiday shopping swings into high gear, more Americans than ever say they doubt they will ever shed their debts, according to the latest annual debt survey by CreditCards.com. According to the poll, 21 percent of those with debt predict they will never be rid of it. That's up from 18 percent in 2014 and 9 percent in 2013 who said their debt heading into the holiday season seemed insurmountable. And yet, at the same time the poll found more people consigning themselves to endless debt, it also found a surge in people living debt-free. This year, 22 percent of those surveyed said they have no debt, compared with 14 percent a year earlier. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 19-22, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,004 adults age 18 or older, including 502 cell phone interviews.

November 2015 Vanderbilt University Poll    Friday, December 04, 2015
Interest in immigration issues increased in Tennessee following the Nov. 13 terrorist attacks in Paris, especially for members of the Tea Party. “The Paris attacks appear to have made immigration a much more important issue for Tea Party members, underscoring a growing divide between them and more traditional Republicans,” said John Geer, Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of Political Science at Vanderbilt University and co-director of the Vanderbilt Poll-Tennessee. New results from the latest Vanderbilt Poll-Tennessee show the number of voters who consider immigration a top priority nearly doubled since May – from 7 percent to 13 percent. For registered voters in the state, immigration remains the fourth highest priority, behind the economy (31 percent), education (24 percent) and health care (17 percent). But that was not the case for Tea Party members; it was the second most important issue for them (26 percent) with the economy first (30 percent). Tea Party members exhibited other differences. When asked if they felt angry at the government, 39 percent of Tea Party members said “Yes,” compared to 26 percent of Republicans. Overall, 23 percent of Tennesseans were angry. These data are in response to a new poll question about voters’ feelings toward the political system. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 11-23, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a sample of 1,103 registered voters in Tennessee, including 160 cell phone interviews.

insuranceQuotes Poll: Worst holiday hazards - from 'porch pirates' to tree fires - and how to avoid them    Wednesday, December 02, 2015
When the eggnog gets passed around and family frivolity goes into full swing, we are typically too engrossed in holiday cheer to think about potential disaster lurking around the corner. However, a new insuranceQuotes.com study finds that the holidays can often come wrapped in a host of possible hazards. A November study polled American adults who were asked to recount the frequency of certain holiday hazards, including injuries to house guests, weather-related driving accidents, and fires caused by cooking mistakes and decoration disasters. The findings were rather staggering. For instance, thieves are taking advantage of online shopping's growing popularity and swiping deliveries from front porches and mailboxes before the packages reach their rightful owners. According to the study, 23 million Americans have had packages stolen from their homes before they could open them. (Numbers are derived from the most recent census figure (2010), showing 234.6 million Americans are ages 18-plus). The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 5-8, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

University of Delaware Poll: Transgender rights, protections    Tuesday, November 24, 2015
From domestic politics and the Syrian refugee crisis to terrorism and the Islamic State, there will be more than enough political fodder to go around the dinner table this year. And a new study from the University of Delaware’s Center for Political Communication suggests a generational blowup over transgender rights could be on the menu this holiday season. In the study, a large majority of people surveyed said they favor protection from discrimination for transgender individuals both in schools (71 percent) and in workplaces (70 percent), and a large majority also supports allowing transgender people to serve openly in the U.S. military (62 percent). The UD survey reveals the public is more divided on requiring public buildings, such as courthouses, to have gender neutral restrooms. Only a slim majority of Americans favor this, by a margin of 51 percent to 43 percent.The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 11-17, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 901 adults age 18 or older, including 557 cell phone interviews.

PSRAI Poll: Americans Closely Following News from Paris; More Worried about Terrorist Attacks in United States    Monday, November 23, 2015
The American public is paying close attention to news about the terrorist attacks in Paris and the continuing investigations in Europe, as the public’s concern about a possible terrorist attack in the United States has risen, a Princeton Survey Research Associates International poll says. And the public is also watching the debate over resettling Syrian refugees in the United States closely, according to the poll. About two in five adults (39%) are watching news about the investigations into the Paris attacks very closely, with 34 percent following the news fairly closely, according to the PSRAI survey. Only 25 percent say they are not following the news out of Paris and elsewhere in Europe. These are relatively high levels of attention to the news by the public, but far short of the attention given in the past to domestic terrorist events, such as the Boston Marathon bombing in 2013, when a Pew Research Center poll found that 63 percent of the public was following that news very closely. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 19-22, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,004 adults age 18 or older, including 502 cell phone interviews.

UMW Poll: Top Virginia Gubernatorial Contenders Largely Unknown to Voters, UMW Survey Shows    Wednesday, November 18, 2015
Potential Republican gubernatorial candidate Ed Gillespie received the support of 40 percent of Virginia registered voters surveyed as compared to 33 percent saying they favored Democratic Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam, according to a new survey sponsored by the University of Mary Washington’s Center for Leadership and Media Studies. Both leading candidates for the 2017 election are largely unknown to Virginia voters, the survey found, even though Gillespie lost a closely fought Senate election in 2014 against Democrat Mark Warner, and Northam won a state-wide election in 2013. Either or both of the candidates may yet face a competition to secure their party’s nomination. Among registered voters, 9 percent had a favorable impression of Gillespie, 9 percent had a negative impression, and 77 percent said they had not heard enough to express an opinion. For Northam, 8 percent of registered voters had a favorable impression, 4 percent had an unfavorable impression and 82 percent had not heard enough about him to form an impression. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 4-9, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a sample of 1,006 adults age 18 or older from the state of Indiana, including 604 cell phone interviews.

Ball State / WISH- TV 2015 Hoosier Poll    Wednesday, November 11, 2015
Job creation continues as the number one priority for Hoosiers with 70% placing job creation at the top of the legislative agenda for lawmakers. However, in a sign of an improving economy, this number was somewhat smaller than last year’s and 13 percentage points lower than it was two years ago. Reducing crime continued as the second highest priority at 69% with improving local schools coming in third at 68% and showing little change from last year. There were two noteworthy increases. The percentage citing improving highways and roads as a top priority rose by 11 percentage points over last year, a sign that Hoosiers may be noticing such matters as the bridge closing for repairs along I-65 North earlier this year. Increasing by 5 percentage points was the number of Hoosiers citing environmental protection as a top priority. Reducing immigration and funding for public transportation continued to trail the other priorities. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 8-13, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a sample of 602 adults age 18 or older from the state of Indiana, including 240 cell phone interviews.

Bankrate Poll: Pining for a gift card from a specific store? You're probably not a millennial     Monday, November 09, 2015
If you're shopping for someone ages 18 to 29, don't bother trying to pick out a gift card for a specific store -- just get a Visa or MasterCard gift card and move on. Nearly 6 in 10 millennials say they'd rather have a general-purpose card than a card from a particular store, restaurant or movie theater. Despite millennials' love of technology, they aren't warm to receiving cards from online retailers, either. Only 5% say they'd want a gift card for an online retailer such as iTunes. A preference for more specific (some would say, more personal) gift cards for particular types of stores seemed to increase with age. Only 30% of those 65 and older say they want a general-purpose gift card, and the vast majority of them prefer cards from brick-and-mortar businesses like retail stores and restaurants. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 1-4, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: October 2015    Wednesday, October 28, 2015
This month’s Kaiser Health Tracking Poll finds that the affordability of prescription drugs continues to be at the top of the public’s priority list for the President and Congress, with “making sure that high-cost drugs are affordable to those who need them” and “government action to lower prescription drug prices” picked as top priorities by majorities across political parties. Issues specific to the ACA, such as repealing provisions of the law or repealing the law entirely, fall much lower on the list. For example, while the public generally opposes the Cadillac tax, a provision of the health care law that has received a lot of attention recently, relatively few (30 percent) say it should be a top priority. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 14-20, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,203 adults age 18 or older, including 722 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Religion and Science    Thursday, October 22, 2015
Are science and religion at odds with each other? A majority of the public says science and religion often conflict, with nearly six-in-ten adults (59%) expressing this view in newly released findings from a Pew Research Center survey. The share of the public saying science and religion are often in conflict is up modestly from 55% in 2009, when Pew Research conducted a similar survey on religion and science. People’s sense that there generally is a conflict between religion and science seems to have less to do with their own religious beliefs than it does with their perceptions of other people’s beliefs. Less than one-third of Americans polled in the new survey (30%) say their personal religious beliefs conflict with science, while fully two-thirds (68%) say there is no conflict between their own beliefs and science. Moreover, the view that science and religion are often in conflict is particularly common among Americans who are, themselves, not very religiously observant (as measured by frequency of attendance at worship services). Some 73% of adults who seldom or never attend religious services say science and religion are often in conflict. By contrast, among more religiously observant Americans – those who report that they attend religious services on a weekly basis – exactly half (50%) share the view that science and religion frequently conflict. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 14-20, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,203 adults age 18 or older, including 722 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: On Immigration Policy, Wider Partisan Divide Over Border Fence Than Path to Legal Status    Thursday, October 08, 2015
As immigration emerges as a key issue in the presidential campaign, there is little common ground between Republicans and Democrats in views of several immigration policy proposals. But partisan disagreements are much more pronounced on some issues than others. Overall, the public continues to be divided over building a fence along the entire U.S.-Mexican border: 46% favor erecting a fence, while 48% are opposed, little changed from 2011. A large majority of Republicans (73%) support a border fence, while 23% are opposed. Democrats oppose building a border fence, 66% to 23%. Among independents, 43% favor a border fence, while 52% oppose this idea. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 22-27, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,502 adults age 18 or older, including 977 cell phone interviews.

The Chronicle of Philanthropy: 1 in 3 Americans Lacks Faith in Charities, Chronicle Poll Finds    Monday, October 05, 2015
Almost two-thirds of Americans have a great deal or a fair amount of confidence in charities, according to a new Chronicle poll — the first to measure public views on that question since 2008. More than 80 percent said charities do a very good or somewhat good job helping people. But a significant number expressed concern about finances: A third said charities do a "not too good" or "not at all good" job spending money wisely; 41 percent said their leaders are paid too much. Half said that in deciding where they will donate, it is very important for them to know that charities spend a low amount on salaries, administration, and fundraising; 34 percent said that was somewhat important. And 35 percent said they had little or no confidence in charities. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 18-21, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Contrasting Partisan Perspectives on Campaign 2016    Friday, October 02, 2015
With four months to go before the first presidential nomination contests, Republican and Democratic voters have sharply different perspectives on their parties’ campaigns – from the qualities they value in candidates to the assessments of their presidential fields and the issues they prioritize. Since March, the share of all registered voters who say it is more important for a presidential candidate to have “new ideas and a different approach” has surged – with virtually all of the increase coming among Republican and Republican-leaning voters. Today, by more than two-to-one (65% to 29%), Republican and Republican-leaning registered voters say it is more important that a candidate have new ideas than “experience and a proven record.” Just five months ago, GOP voters valued experience and a proven record over new ideas, 57% to 36%. Opinion among Democratic voters continues to be more evenly divided: 50% say it is more important for a candidate to have experience and a proven record, while 42% view new ideas and a different approach as more important. This is little changed from March (46% experience, 49% new ideas). The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 22-27, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,502 adults age 18 or older, including 977 cell phone interviews.

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: September 2015    Wednesday, September 30, 2015
As the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services prepares to finalize a plan to pay physicians for discussing end-of-life treatment options with Medicare patients, this month’s Kaiser Health Tracking Poll finds that about 8 in 10 of the public favors Medicare and private insurance covering such discussions and about 9 in 10 say doctors should have these discussions with their patients. However, relatively few (17 percent) say they’ve had such discussions with a doctor or other health care provider, including 27 percent of people age 65 or older, while half of the public says they would want to have such a discussion. Over 8 in 10 say they would feel very comfortable talking about their end-of-life medical wishes with their spouse or partner and closer to half say they would be very comfortable talking with a doctor, their children, their close friends or their parents. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 17-23, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,202 adults age 18 or older, including 721 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Mixed Views of Initial U.S. Response to Europe’s Migrant Crisis    Tuesday, September 29, 2015
The public has mixed reactions to the U.S. response to the influx of hundreds of thousands of migrants arriving in Europe in recent weeks. By a narrow 51%-45% margin, more approve than disapprove of the U.S. decision to increase the number of refugees it accepts to help deal with this situation. When asked to assess the United States’ response to the refugee situation more generally, 44% say the U.S. should be doing more, while 19% say it should be doing less; 31% say the U.S. is doing about what it should. The latest national poll by the Pew Research Center finds that the migrant crisis has registered widely with the public: 55% say they have heard a lot about the large number of migrants fleeing violence in Syria and other countries and entering Europe, and an additional 32% have heard a little. Just 12% have heard nothing about the migrant crisis. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 22-27, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,502 adults age 18 or older, including 977 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Majority Says Any Budget Deal Must Include Planned Parenthood Funding    Monday, September 28, 2015
With the prospect of a government shutdown apparently decreasing, the public by a wide margin says that any congressional budget agreement must maintain funding for Planned Parenthood. The latest national poll by the Pew Research Cente finds that 60% say that any budget deal must maintain funding for Planned Parenthood, while 32% say that any agreement must eliminate funding for the organization. If lawmakers fail to agree on a budget and the government does shut down, more say the Republicans (40%) than the Democrats (26%) would be more to blame; about a quarter (23%) volunteer that both sides would be equally to blame. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 22-27, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,502 adults age 18 or older, including 977 cell phone interviews.

Public Affairs Pulse: What Americans Think About Big Business    Thursday, September 10, 2015
While a large majority of Americans have favorable attitudes about major companies, many aren’t sure they can trust them. According to the 2015 Public Affairs Pulse survey, only 10 percent say they have a lot of trust and confidence that businesses will behave ethically. And only 43 percent have some trust or confidence in the ethical behavior of big business. Conversely, a substantial share (46%) say they do not have much or any trust and confidence. Not all corporate employees are viewed the same way, however. The higher up the management hierarchy, the lower the trust rating. Forty-two percent say CEOs of major companies have low levels of honesty and ethics — and only seven percent say they are highly ethical. In contrast, 19 percent think middle managers are dishonest, and only 11 percent say non-management employees have low ethical standards. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 6-20, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,601 adults age 18 or older, including 801 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Support for Iran Nuclear Agreement Falls    Tuesday, September 08, 2015
As Congress prepares to vote on the Iran nuclear agreement, public support for the deal has declined. Currently, just 21% approve of the agreement on Iran’s nuclear program reached between the United States, Iran and other nations. Nearly half (49%) disapprove of the agreement, while three-in-ten (30%) offer no opinion. In mid-July, a week after President Obama announced the deal, 33% of the public approved of the agreement, while 45% disapproved and 22% had no opinion. Over the past six weeks, the share approving of the agreement has fallen 12 percentage points (from 33% to 21%), while disapproval has held fairly steady (45% then, 49% now). Somewhat more express no opinion than did so in July (22% then, 30% now). The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center finds that the contentious debate over the Iran agreement has not resonated widely with the public. In fact, the share saying they have heard either a lot or a little about the agreement has declined from 79% in July to 69% in the new survey. The share saying they have heard “nothing at all” about it has increased nine percentage points, from 21% to 30%. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 3-6, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,004 adults age 18 or older, including 503 cell phone interviews.

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: August 2015    Thursday, August 20, 2015
With renewed discussion of the high cost of prescription drugs recently, the August Kaiser Health Tracking poll finds that most Americans feel that drug costs are unreasonable (72 percent) and that drug companies put profits before people (74 percent). At the same time, the public largely values the role prescription drug companies play, with most (62 percent) saying that prescription drugs developed in the past two decades have made the lives of people in the U.S. better, including about 4 in 10 (42 percent) who say a lot better. About half of Americans (54 percent) report currently taking prescription drugs, with most of them (72 percent) saying they are easy to afford, while about a quarter (24 percent) say they have a difficult time paying for their drugs; a share that rises among those with lower incomes (33 percent) or in worse health (43 percent). Large shares, across the partisan spectrum, have favorable views of several proposed actions to lower drug costs, including requiring drug companies to release information to the public on how they set their drug prices (86 percent) and allowing the federal government to negotiate with drug companies to get a lower price on medications for people on Medicare (83 percent), and majorities also say these strategies would be effective. Reflective in part of the perceived high costs of prescription drugs and focus on profits, about 4 in 10 (42 percent) Americans have a favorable view of drug companies, lower than the shares who feel favorably towards doctors (78 percent), food manufacturers (58 percent) and banks (58 percent). The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted August 6-11, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,200 adults age 18 or older, including 720 cell phone interviews.

iMediaEthics Poll: Three Of Four Americans Don’t Know What Iran Nuclear Deal Is All About    Monday, August 17, 2015
A new poll by iMediaEthics finds a large majority of Americans clueless as to what the nuclear deal with Iran is intended to accomplish. Only 8 percent of Americans say they know a lot about the agreement, 32 percent say “a fair amount,” while 59 percent say know they little or nothing at all about it. Half the sample of 1,000 respondents was given no information, but was simply asked if Congress should vote to support or oppose the agreement – 17 percent of this group said support, 24 percent said oppose, and a substantial majority, 58 percent, offered no opinion. When this same group was asked what they thought the agreement is intended to do, just 25 percent accurately said it was intended to prevent Iran from getting any nuclear weapons. The rest said the intent of the agreement was either to authorize Iran to produce a limited number of nuclear weapons (11 percent), or to allow Iran to share U.S. nuclear technology to build nuclear power plants (9 percent) – or they didn’t know what the agreement is intended to accomplish (55 percent). The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted August 6-9, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Continued Bipartisan Support for Expanded Background Checks on Gun Sales    Thursday, August 13, 2015
Two years after the failure of Senate legislation to expand background checks on gun purchases, the public continues to overwhelmingly support making private gun sales and sales at gun shows subject to background checks. Currently, 85% of Americans – including large majorities of Democrats (88%) and Republicans (79%) – favor expanded background checks, little changed from May 2013 (81%). The latest Pew Research Center poll finds that opinions about other gun policy proposals also are largely unchanged from two years ago, shortly after the December 2012 school shootings in Newtown, Conn. Nearly eight-in-ten (79%) favor laws to prevent people with mental illness from purchasing guns, 70% back the creation of a federal database to track all gun sales, while a smaller majority (57%) supports a ban on assault-style weapons. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 14-20, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,002 adults age 18 or older, including 1,302 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Across Racial Lines, More Say Nation Needs to Make Changes to Achieve Racial Equality    Wednesday, August 05, 2015
Over the past year, there has been a substantial rise in the share of Americans — across racial and ethnic groups — who say the country needs to continue making changes to give blacks equal rights with whites, and a growing number of Americans view racism as a big problem in society. Today, 50 years after the passage of the Voting Rights Act, roughly six-in-ten Americans (59%) say the country needs to continue making changes to achieve racial equality, while 32% say the country has made the changes needed to give blacks equal rights with whites. A year ago — and at previous points in the last six years — public opinion was much more closely divided on this question. Though a substantial racial divide in these views remains, a majority of whites (53%) now say more needs to be done. Last year, just 39% of whites said this. And although large majorities of African Americans have consistently said that changes must continue to be made to achieve racial equality, the share saying this now (86%) is greater than in the past. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 14-20, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,002 adults age 18 or older, including 1,302 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Negative Views of Supreme Court at Record High, Driven by Republican Dissatisfaction    Wednesday, July 29, 2015
Following major, end-of-term rulings on the Affordable Care Act and same-sex marriage, unfavorable opinions of the Supreme Court have reached a 30-year high. And opinions about the court and its ideology have never been more politically divided. Currently, 48% of Americans have a favorable impression of the Supreme Court, while 43% view the court unfavorably. Unfavorable opinions of the court, while up only modestly since March (39%), are the highest recorded since 1985. The latest national survey by Pew Research Center finds that most of the increase in unfavorable views of the Supreme Court has come among Republicans. Just 33% of Republicans have a favorable opinion of the court, while 61% have an unfavorable view. Since March, the share of Republicans viewing the court favorably has fallen 17 percentage points (from 50% to 33%), while the share with an unfavorable impression has jumped 21 percentage points (from 40% to 61%). Republicans’ views of the Supreme Court are now more negative than at any point in the past three decades. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 14-20, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,002 adults age 18 or older, including 1,302 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: GOP’s Favorability Rating Takes a Negative Turn    Thursday, July 23, 2015
The Republican Party’s image has grown more negative over the first half of this year. Currently, 32% have a favorable impression of the Republican Party, while 60% have an unfavorable view. Favorable views of the GOP have fallen nine percentage points since January. The Democratic Party continues to have mixed ratings (48% favorable, 47% unfavorable). The Democratic Party has often held an edge over the GOP in favorability in recent years, but its advantage had narrowed following the Republicans’ midterm victory last fall. Today, the gap is as wide as it has been in more than two years. Republicans, in particular, are now more critical of their own party than they were a few months ago. About two-thirds (68%) express a favorable opinion of their party, the lowest share in more than two years. Six months ago, 86% of Republicans viewed the GOP positively. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 14-20, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,002 adults age 18 or older, including 1,302 cell phone interviews.

Bankrate Poll: Financial security remains strong despite job concerns    Wednesday, July 22, 2015
Americans continue to feel good about their personal finances despite a diminished confidence in their jobs, according to a monthly reading by Bankrate. Bankrate's Financial Security Index for July remained in positive territory for the 14th month. However, the monthly reading was 2.3 percent lower than June's index -- thanks, in part, to a decline in job security. The index measured 102.1 for the month. Any reading above 100 indicates improved financial security over the past 12 months. When asked how they felt about their jobs compared with 12 months ago, 22 percent said they felt "more secure" while 14 percent said they felt "less secure." That was a weaker response than in June, when 29 percent said they felt "more secure" and 9 percent said "less secure." Americans also showed more pessimism about their level of savings. When asked about the money they'd socked away, 29 percent said they were "less comfortable" with their level of savings compared with a year ago. Only 18 percent said they were "more comfortable." The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 9-12, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: A Year Later, U.S. Campaign Against ISIS Garners Support, Raises Concerns    Wednesday, July 22, 2015
Nearly a year after the United States launched its first airstrikes against ISIS, the public remains broadly supportive of the military campaign. Yet Americans also have persistent doubts about how well the U.S. military effort is going, and there is no agreement about whether the U.S. should deploy ground troops as part of the military campaign in Iraq and Syria. About six-in-ten Americans (63%) approve of the U.S. military campaign against Islamic militants in Iraq and Syria; just 26% disapprove of the campaign. Support is somewhat higher today than for President Obama’s first airstrikes against Islamic militants in Iraq in August 2014 (54% approved). In that poll, Republicans were 17 points more likely than Democrats to approve of U.S. military action (71% vs. 54%). Today, there are virtually no partisan differences in support for the U.S. military campaign against Islamic militants in Iraq and Syria; 67% of Republicans approve of the campaign, as do 64% of Democrats. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 14-20, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,002 adults age 18 or older, including 1,302 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Growing Public Support for U.S. Ties With Cuba – And an End to the Trade Embargo    Tuesday, July 21, 2015
As the United States and Cuba moved this week to end more than 50 years of diplomatic conflict, public support for re-establishing relations with Cuba has increased. There is equally broad, and growing, support for ending the U.S. trade embargo against Cuba. In addition, a separate survey released today finds that the publics of several Latin American nations also view renewed U.S.-Cuba relations favorably. Nearly three-quarters (73%) of Americans say they approve of the U.S. re-establishing diplomatic relations with Cuba, up 10 points since January. A similar majority (72%) favors the U.S. ending its trade embargo against Cuba, “which would allow U.S. companies to do business in Cuba and Cuban companies to do business in the U.S.” The share saying a thaw in U.S.-Cuba relations will lead to increased democracy in Cuba also has risen, though fewer than half (43%) say they expect Cuba to become more democratic over the next several years. Still, in January just 32% predicted that Cuba would become more democratic. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 14-20, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,002 adults age 18 or older, including 1,302 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Iran Nuclear Agreement Meets With Public Skepticism    Tuesday, July 21, 2015
More Americans disapprove than approve of the deal struck last week by the U.S., Iran and five other nations to limit Iran’s nuclear program: Among the 79% of Americans who have heard about the agreement, just 38% approve, while 48% disapprove (14% do not offer an opinion).  There is widespread skepticism about aspects of the agreement, particularly the Iranian leadership’s commitment to the terms of the deal: Most of those familiar with the agreement say they have not too much (35%) or no confidence at all (38%) that Iran’s leaders will uphold their side of the agreement. And while there is greater confidence in the U.S. and international agencies’ ability to monitor Iran’s compliance, 54% are not too (33%) or not at all (21%) confident, while a smaller share (45%) express at least a fair amount of confidence in their ability. Views about the agreement’s effect on U.S.-Iranian relations also are split: Though a plurality (42%) of those who have heard about the deal say there will be little change, about as many think relations between the two nations will worsen (28%) as think they will improve (25%) as a result of the agreement. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 14-20, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,002 adults age 18 or older, including 1,302 cell phone interviews.

Pew Global: Climate Change Seen as Top Global Threat    Tuesday, July 14, 2015
In advance of the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris this December, many publics around the world name global climate change as a top threat, according to a new Pew Research Center survey measuring perceptions of international challenges. This is particularly true in Latin America and Africa, where majorities in most countries say they are very concerned about this issue. But as the Islamic militant group ISIS maintains its hold in Iraq and Syria and intensifies its grisly public executions, Europeans and Middle Easterners most frequently cite ISIS as their main concern among international issues. Global economic instability also figures prominently as the top concern in a number of countries, and it is the second biggest concern in half of the countries surveyed. In contrast, concerns about Iran’s nuclear program as well as cyberattacks on governments, banks or corporations are limited to a few nations. Israelis and Americans are among the most concerned about Iran’s nuclear program, while South Koreans and Americans have the greatest concern about cyberattacks relative to other publics. And apprehension about tensions between Russia and its neighbors, or territorial disputes between China and surrounding countries, largely remain regional concerns. Results for the survey are based on telephone and face-to-face interviews conducted under the direction of Princeton Survey Research Associates International. The results are based on national samples, unless otherwise noted.

Bankrate Money Pulse: How many of us have life insurance? And how many have enough of it?    Wednesday, July 08, 2015
While about 6 in 10 Americans say they own life insurance, nearly half of them may have insufficient coverage to address the financial needs of their family upon their demise, according to the latest Bankrate Money Pulse survey. "You look at this and say, 'Boy, there are a lot of families out there that are very underinsured!'" says Brendan Bridgeland, the director of the Center for Insurance Research, a nonprofit consumer organization based in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The insured rate for those with whole, universal, variable or term life coverage follows the traditional upward age curve, increasing steadily from fewer than half of young people ages 18 to 29 (44%) to two-thirds having life insurance in the 65-and-over bracket (65%). However, the benefit amount of those policies may leave survivors, especially young families, in financial trouble should their main wage earner pass away. Nearly half (47%) of insured respondents carry coverage amounts of $100,000 or less, including 21% with a benefit amount of $25,000 or less. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 18-21, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: Late June 2015 - A Special Focus On The Supreme Court Decision    Wednesday, July 01, 2015
The latest Kaiser Health Tracking Poll finds that following the Supreme Court’s decision in King v. Burwell, a case challenging the legality of health insurance subsidies in states with federally operated exchanges under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), public attention to the case inched up, though many Americans remain tuned out amid other breaking news stories. When told that the Court ruled to keep the law as it is, allowing subsidies to be provided to low- and moderate-income people in all states regardless of who runs their Marketplace, about 6 in 10 say they approve of the decision while about a third disapprove. Even among Republicans and those who view the ACA unfavorably, about 3 in 10 say they approve of the Court’s decision. The ruling does not appear to have had an immediate effect on the public’s overall views of the law. Opinion remains pretty much evenly divided (43 percent favorable, 40 percent unfavorable), as it has been for the past several months. Still, most Americans do not think the ACA has cleared its last big hurdle with the recent Supreme Court ruling; just 18 percent think the recent debate over who can receive financial help under the law was the last major battle over the ACA, while nearly 8 in 10 think there will be more major battles about the law in the future. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 25-29, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,202 adults age 18 or older, including 720 cell phone interviews.

CreditCards Poll: Americans sleeping better as economy recovers    Wednesday, June 24, 2015
Losing sleep over financial stress is on the decline in the U.S., according to a new CreditCards.com poll. A national poll commissioned by CreditCards.com found that 62 percent of adult Americans are losing sleep over at least one financial problem -- 7 percentage points lower than in June 2009, the last time this poll was conducted. Today's most common money worry is saving enough for retirement; two in five Americans say this keeps them up at night at least occasionally. The second biggest concern is educational expenses, which trouble young adults the most. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted May 28-31, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

Bankrate Poll: Americans still lack savings despite bigger paychecks    Tuesday, June 23, 2015
Wages may be on the rise, but a record-high percentage of Americans still aren't socking away those gains for life's unexpected crises. When asked about their emergency savings, 29 percent of Americans reported they had none, according to a survey that accompanied Bankrate's Financial Security Index for June. That's the highest level in five years of surveying and up from 26 percent last year. Another 21 percent said they had some savings but not enough to cover three months of expenses, and 13 percent didn't know how much they had or declined to answer. Only 22 percent said they had enough to pay for at least six months of expenses, which is generally considered by personal finance experts to be the amount needed for a satisfactory cushion. "These results are further evidence that Americans remain woefully under-saved for unplanned expenses," says Greg McBride, CFA, Bankrate's chief financial analyst. "And rather than progressing, (Americans) are moving in the wrong direction. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 4 -7, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

Pew Global Poll: Global Publics Back U.S. on Fighting ISIS, but Are Critical of Post-9/11 Torture    Tuesday, June 23, 2015
The rise of ISIS has generated strong concerns in nations around the world, and a new Pew Research Center survey finds broad global support for American military efforts against the terrorist group. And unlike the Iraq War a decade ago, the current U.S. air campaign in Iraq and Syria is backed by majorities in America’s European allies and endorsed by publics in key Middle Eastern nations. However, global publics mostly oppose another element of recent U.S. national security policy: the harsh interrogation methods used against suspected terrorists in the wake of 9/11 that many consider torture. A median of 50% across 40 nations surveyed say they oppose these practices, which were detailed in a widely publicized U.S. Senate report in December 2014. Only 35% believe they were justified. Americans disagree – nearly six-in-ten (58%) say they were justified. Results for the survey are based on telephone and face-to-face interviews conducted under the direction of Princeton Survey Research Associates International. The results are based on national samples, unless otherwise noted.

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: June 2015    Tuesday, June 16, 2015
Given recent news about some high-cost prescription drugs and the debate about who should pay for them, this month’s Kaiser Health Tracking Poll has a special focus on the issue. Nearly three-quarters of the public think that the cost of prescription drugs is unreasonable. Americans place much of the blame with the drug companies saying they set prices too high and that company profits are a major factor in drug pricing. About half say there isn’t enough government regulation limiting the price of prescription medicines and 12 percent say there is too much. Overall, half of the public reports currently taking a prescription medicine, with about 1 in 5 of them saying they or a family member have skipped doses or cut pills in half due to cost or that they have a hard time affording them– rising to about a third among those with lower incomes. Asked about who should pay for high drug costs, about 7 in 10 of the public says health insurance should always pay if no lower-cost alternative exists, even if it leads to higher premiums for others. However, a majority says that insurance should only pay if the drug has been proven more effective than existing treatments. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 2-9, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,200 adults age 18 or older, including 720 cell phone interviews.

Pew Global: NATO Publics Blame Russia for Ukrainian Crisis, but Reluctant to Provide Military Aid    Wednesday, June 10, 2015
Publics of key member nations of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) blame Russia for the ongoing conflict in Ukraine. Many also see Russia as a military threat to other neighboring states. But few support sending arms to Ukraine. Moreover, at least half of Germans, French and Italians say their country should not use military force to defend a NATO ally if attacked by Russia. A median of 39% among NATO publics say Russia is the main culprit in the ongoing conflict in eastern Ukraine. The pro-Russian separatists in Luhans’k and Donets’k (18%) are a distant second. Half say Russia is a major military threat to other neighboring nations. In response to the crisis, 70% among allied countries say Western countries should send economic aid to Ukraine. A majority (57%) also supports Ukraine becoming a member of NATO. NATO nations are hesitant, however, to escalate their involvement in the conflict, especially militarily. Comparatively few support sending arms to Ukraine (median of 41%). And many allied countries are reluctant to uphold Article 5 of the North Atlantic Treaty, which requires NATO members to defend an ally with armed force if necessary. A median of 48% among these publics say their country should use military force if Russia gets into a serious military conflict with a neighboring nation that is a NATO ally, while 42% are opposed. Results for the survey are based on telephone and face-to-face interviews conducted under the direction of Princeton Survey Research Associates International. The results are based on national samples, unless otherwise noted. 

Pew Poll: Support for Same-Sex Marriage at Record High, but Key Segments Remain Opposed    Monday, June 08, 2015
As the Supreme Court prepares to decide a key case involving states’ requirements to recognize same-sex marriage, public support for allowing gays and lesbians to marry legally continues its rapid rise: A 57% majority of Americans now favor allowing same-sex marriage and 39% oppose. As recently as five years ago, more opposed (48%) same-sex marriage than supported it (42%). This is the highest level of support measured for same-sex marriage in nearly 20 years of Pew Research Center polling of the issue. Yet even as support for same-sex marriage has increased among nearly all segments in the public, some groups remain broadly opposed to gay marriage. The Pew Research Center survey finds that partisans are as divided on this issue as ever: Today, 65% of Democrats and an identical percentage of independents favor gay marriage; only about one third (34%) of Republicans do so. Growing shares of all three groups support same-sex marriage, yet the differences between Democrats and Republicans are as wide today as they were a decade ago. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted May 12-18, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,002 adults age 18 or older, including 1,302 cell phone interviews.

Penn Study: Americans Give Up Personal Data for Discounts, They Believe Marketers Will Get It Anyway    Friday, June 05, 2015
Marketers have said for years that Americans give up their data online, on apps and in stores because of the benefits they receive, such as discounts or special offers.  But a new national survey from the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg School for Communication rebuts this claim and offers a new explanation: resignation.  It finds that most Americans disclose their personal data to companies for discounts because they believe that marketers will harvest the data anyway. “Resignation occurs when a person believes an undesirable outcome is inevitable and feels powerless to stop it,” said Joseph Turow, professor of communication and lead author of the study. The survey found that more than half of Americans say they do not want to lose control over their information but also believe this loss of control has already happened.  Turow argues that marketers misrepresent Americans’ behaviors by categorizing their acceptance of company discounts in exchange for personal data as rational acceptance of “tradeoffs.” The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 23 - March 15, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,506 adults age 18 or older, including 756 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Broad Public Support for Legal Status for Undocumented Immigrants    Thursday, June 04, 2015
With immigration shaping up to be a major issue in both the final years of the Obama administration and the 2016 presidential campaign, most Americans (72%) continue to say undocumented immigrants currently living in the U.S. should be allowed to stay in the country legally, if certain requirements are met. These views have fluctuated only modestly over the past two years. As in prior surveys, a majority of those who favor granting legal status for people in the U.S. illegally – 42% of the public overall – say they should be able to apply for U.S. citizenship. About a quarter of the public (26%) say they should only be able to apply for permanent residency. About half (51%) say immigrants today strengthen the country because of their hard work and talents, while 41% say immigrants are a burden because they take jobs, housing and health care. The share saying that immigrants strengthen the country has declined six percentage points since last year. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted May 12-18, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,002 adults age 18 or older, including 1,302 cell phone interviews.

Pew Global: Faith in European Project Reviving    Tuesday, June 02, 2015
To paraphrase the American author and humorist Mark Twain, recent reports of the death of the European Union were greatly exaggerated. In the wake of the euro currency crisis, public support for the EU and the belief that European economic integration was good for one’s country had declined precipitously across Europe, reaching a low point in 2013. But in 2015, favorable views of the EU and faith in the efficacy of creating a single market are generally rebounding in major EU member states, according to a new survey by the Pew Research Center. And this revival in pro-EU sentiment is closely related to the public’s economic mood. To be clear, most European publics surveyed still think economic conditions in their countries are lousy. And in many nations they are. But the economic downturn appears to have bottomed out in most places, and there are signs of recovery, particularly in Spain and the United Kingdom. Public assessment of the current economic situation has correspondingly improved across Europe in the past two years, even while publics remain fairly pessimistic about the future. And those who now think economic conditions are good are much more likely to favor the EU and European economic integration than those who see their economy as doing poorly. At the same time, in some nations there are quite significant differences between the higher level of trust in the EU as an institution and the lower public confidence in the European project. Results for the survey are based on telephone and face-to-face interviews conducted under the direction of Princeton Survey Research Associates International. The results are based on national samples, unless otherwise noted.

Pew Poll: Public Continues to Back U.S. Drone Attacks    Thursday, May 28, 2015
The public continues to support U.S. drone strikes targeting extremists in Pakistan and elsewhere, despite ongoing concerns that drone attacks endanger lives of innocent civilians. The national survey by the Pew Research Center finds that 58% approve of the U.S. conducting missile strikes from drones to target extremists in such countries as Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia. About a third (35%) disapprove of U.S. drone attacks. Public opinion about U.S. drone strikes has changed only modestly since February 2013, when 56% approved and 26% disapproved of drone attacks. Support for drone strikes crosses party lines, though Republicans (74%) are more likely than independents (56%) or Democrats (52%) to favor the use of drones to target extremists. While men approve of drone attacks by more than two-to-one (67% to 28%), the balance of opinion is much narrower among women. Half (50%) of women approve of the use of drones to target extremists, while 42% disapprove. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted May 12-18, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,002 adults age 18 or older, including 1,302 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Free Trade Agreements Seen as Good for U.S., But Concerns Persist    Wednesday, May 27, 2015
As Congress considers a major new trade pact with Asia, there is broad public agreement that international free trade agreements are good for the United States. But fewer Americans express positive views of the impact of trade deals on their personal finances. And, as in the past, far more say free trade agreements lead to lower wages and job losses in the United States than say they result in higher wages and job gains. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center finds that 58% say free trade agreements with other countries have been a good thing for the U.S., while 33% say they have been a bad thing. Majorities across income categories say free trade agreements have been a positive thing for the U.S., but there are much wider income differences in opinions about the personal impact of free trade agreements. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted May 18-22, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,002 adults age 18 or older, including 1,302 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Negative Views of New Congress Cross Party Lines    Thursday, May 21, 2015
The new Republican-led Congress is drawing harsh reviews from the public – including most Republicans. Just 23% of Americans say congressional Republicans are keeping the promises they made during last fall’s campaign, while 65% say they are not. Nearly four-in-ten (37%) say the new Congress has accomplished less than they expected, while 4% say it has accomplished more than expected. About half (53%) say its accomplishments are in line with what they expected. On both measures, the public’s views are far more negative than they were of the Democratic-led Congress in March 2007, after the Democrats regained control of both chambers following several years of Republican control. Views are also much more negative than they were in April 1995, shortly after the GOP had gained control of the House and Senate for the first time in four decades. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted May 18-22, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,002 adults age 18 or older, including 1,302 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Republicans’ Early Views of GOP Field More Positive Than in 2012, 2008 Campaigns    Tuesday, May 19, 2015
From the start, the Republican presidential field for 2016 has been much more crowded than the Democratic field. But voters in each party have similar views of the quality of their party’s candidates. Nearly six-in-ten (57%) Republican and Republican-leaning registered voters say they have an excellent or good impression of their party’s presidential candidates. That compares with 54% of Democratic and Democratic-leaning voters who have positive impressions of the Democratic Party’s candidates. Republicans are more positive about the GOP field than they were at nearly comparable points in the past two presidential campaigns. In May 2011, 44% of Republicans viewed the field of GOP candidates as excellent or good. In September 2007, 50% gave the presidential candidates positive marks. Democrats are less positive about the current group of candidates than they were in September 2007, at a somewhat later point in the 2008 campaign. At that time, 64% said the Democratic candidates as a group were excellent or good. Throughout the fall of 2007 and early 2008, Democrats consistently expressed more positive views about their party’s candidates than Republicans did about theirs. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted May 18-22, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,002 adults age 18 or older, including 1,302 cell phone interviews.

Vanderbilt Poll: Majority don't support gun control measures    Wednesday, May 13, 2015
Allowing Tennesseans with permits to bring handguns into parks or buy guns without a background check isn't supported by the majority of Tennessee voters polled in the latest edition of the Vanderbilt Poll. At the same time, the poll doesn't show overwhelming support for measures like banning guns within 250 feet of a school or banning guns on any property owned, used or operated by a school. 50 percent of respondents support banning guns within 250 feet of a school. Most of that support comes from Democrats — 59 percent — with only 46 percent of Republicans and 30 percent of self-identified Tea Party members supporting the idea.
44 percent of respondents support allowing people to have firearms in public parks. Only 20 percent of Democrats support this idea, compared to 50 percent of Republicans and 65 percent of Tea Party members.
42 percent of respondents support banning guns on any property owned, used or operated by a school. Nearly half of Democratic respondents support the plan, while only 39 percent of Republicans and 30 percent of Tea Party members support the ban. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted April 23 to May 9, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a representative sample of 1,001 registerd voters in Tennessee, including 185 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: Mixed Views of Impact of Long-Term Decline in Union Membership    Monday, April 27, 2015
Over the past three decades, the share of wage and salary workers in the United States who belong to labor unions has fallen by about half.  The public expresses mixed views of the impact of the long-term decline in union membership on the country: 45% say this has been mostly a bad thing, while 43% see it as mostly a good thing. However, the effects of the decline in union membership on working people is seen in more negative terms: 52% say the reduction in union representation has been mostly bad for working people, compared with fewer (40%) who say it has been mostly good. The balance of opinion on this question is about the same as it was in a 1994 NBC/Wall Street Journal survey that asked about the previous 20 years. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center, conducted March 25-29 among 1,500 adults, finds little recent change in overall favorability of labor unions: 48% hold a favorable view of unions, while somewhat fewer (39%) say they have an unfavorable view. Opinions of unions have recovered from lows reached in 2010 and 2011. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 25-29, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,500 adults age 18 or older, including 975 cell phone interviews.

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: April 2015    Tuesday, April 21, 2015
This month’s Kaiser Health Tracking Poll finds public opinion of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) continues to be almost evenly split, with 43 percent reporting a favorable view and 42 percent reporting an unfavorable view. The share with a favorable view exceeds the share with an unfavorable view for the first time since November 2012, albeit by one percentage point, and the difference is within the survey’s margin of sampling error and is not statistically significant.  When asked about health care priorities for the President and Congress, the change that comes out on top for Democrats, Republicans and independents alike is making sure that high-cost drugs for chronic conditions, such as HIV, hepatitis, mental illness and cancer, are affordable to those who need them, with three-quarters of the public (76 percent) saying this should be a top priority.  Sixty percent say that government action to lower prescription drug prices should be a top priority and majorities say things like provider network protections and increased transparency related to the prices and quality of health care should be top priorities. Other than high-cost prescription drugs, Democrats, Republicans and independents have different ideas of their top priorities in health care. In terms of the availability of price and quality information, fewer than 1 in 5 say they have seen any information comparing the quality or prices for hospitals, doctors, or health insurers in the past 12 months, and fewer than 1 in 10 report using these types of information. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted April 8-14, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,506 adults age 18 or older, including 905 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Views of Supreme Court Little Changed as Major Rulings Loom    Monday, April 20, 2015
Public views of the Supreme Court are little changed since last summer, following the court’s ruling in the Hobby Lobby case and other end-of-term decisions. Currently, half of Americans (50%) have a favorable opinion of the Supreme Court, while 39% say they have an unfavorable view. The court’s upcoming decisions, on such contentious subjects as same-sex marriage, the death penalty and the Affordable Care Act, have the potential to affect opinions of the court. The court will hear arguments April 28 in cases to overturn state bans on same-sex marriage. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center finds no significant partisan differences in views of the court: 54% of Democrats and 50% of Republicans view the Supreme Court favorably. Little Partisan Gap in Current Views of Supreme CourtIn recent years, partisan views of the court shifted following major, end-of-term decisions. In 2012, the share of Republicans viewing the court favorably declined 18 points (from 56% to 38%), after the court’s ruling upholding most parts of the Affordable Care Act; by contrast, favorable opinions among Democrats rose 12 points (from 52% to 64%). The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 25-29, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,500 adults age 18 or older, including 975 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Less Support for Death Penalty, Especially Among Democrats    Thursday, April 16, 2015
A majority of Americans favor the death penalty for those convicted of murder, but support for the death penalty is as low as it has been in the past 40 years. A new Pew Research Center survey finds 56% favor the death penalty for people convicted of murder, while 38% are opposed. The share supporting the death penalty has declined six percentage points, from 62%, since 2011. Throughout much of the 1980s and 90s, support for the death penalty often surpassed 70%. In a 1996 survey, 78% favored the death penalty, while just 18% were opposed. Much of the decline in support over the past two decades has come among Democrats. Currently, just 40% of Democrats favor the death penalty, while 56% are opposed. In 1996, Democrats favored capital punishment by a wide margin (71% to 25%). There has been much less change in opinions among Republicans: 77% favor the death penalty, down from 87% in 1996. The share of independents who favor the death penalty has fallen 22 points over this period, from 79% to 57%. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 25-29, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,500 adults age 18 or older, including 975 cell phone interviews.

Pew Global: Cell Phones in Africa - Communication Lifeline    Wednesday, April 15, 2015
In a few short years, the proliferation of mobile phone networks has transformed communications in sub-Saharan Africa. It has also allowed Africans to skip the landline stage of development and jump right to the digital age. Cell phones are pervasive in the region. In 2002, roughly one-in-ten owned a mobile phone in Tanzania, Uganda, Kenya and Ghana. Since then, cell phone ownership has grown exponentially. Today, cell phones are as common in South Africa and Nigeria as they are in the United States. Smartphones (those that can access the internet and applications) are less widely used, though significant minorities own these devices in several nations, including 34% of South Africans. Cell phones have different uses for different people, but sending text messages and taking pictures or video are the most popular activities among mobile owners. In a few nations, such as Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania, mobile banking is also relatively common. Other activities, such as getting political news, accessing a social networking site, getting health and consumer information and looking for a job are done less frequently. Results for the survey are interviews conducted April 11 to June 5, 2014, among 7,052 respondents in Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Tanzania and Uganda. All interviews were face-to-face.

Pew Poll: In Debate Over Legalizing Marijuana, Disagreement Over Drug’s Dangers    Tuesday, April 14, 2015
Public opinion about legalizing marijuana, while little changed in the past few years, has undergone a dramatic long-term shift. A new survey finds that 53% favor the legal use of marijuana, while 44% are opposed.  As recently as 2006, just 32% supported marijuana legalization, while nearly twice as many (60%) were opposed. Millennials (currently 18-34) have been in the forefront of this change: 68% favor legalizing marijuana use, by far the highest percentage of any age cohort. But across all generations –except for the Silent Generation (ages 70-87) – support for legalization has risen sharply over the past decade. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center finds that supporters of legalizing the use of marijuana are far more likely than opponents to say they have changed their mind on this issue. Among the public overall, 30% say they support legalizing marijuana use and have always felt that way, while 21% have changed their minds; they say there was a time when they thought it should be illegal. By contrast, 35% say they oppose legalization and have always felt that way; just 7% have changed their minds from supporting to opposing legalization. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 25-29, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,500 adults age 18 or older, including 975 cell phone interviews.

Bankrate Poll: Did you miss the stock market rally? You're not alone    Thursday, April 09, 2015
Despite the proliferation of investment-based retirement accounts such as 401(k)s, 52 percent of Americans report not owning any stocks or stock-based investments such as mutual funds, according to Bankrate's Money Pulse survey. That doesn't surprise Robert Stammers, CFA, director of investor education for the CFA Institute. He says many Americans "see themselves as savers and they worry about capital preservation." Because of that, "they don't take the risk necessary to achieve the returns that they need to fulfill their long-term investment goals." Opting out of stocks, which have historically been one of the highest-returning types of securities available to individual investors, is likely to have some harsh consequences for Americans over the long term. "The average person has less than $25,000 saved for retirement," Stammers says. "So people certainly aren't prepared, and that's just making them less prepared." For adults under 30, only 26 percent of whom said they own stock, the consequences could be profound. Young people who don't invest in equities early are set to have "a lot less money later on," says John Salter, associate professor of financial planning at Texas Tech University. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 19-22, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,001 adults age 18 and older including 501 cellphone interviews.

Pew Global: Americans, Japanese: Mutual Respect 70 Years After the End of WWII    Tuesday, April 07, 2015
Adversaries in World War II, fierce economic competitors in the 1980s and early 1990s, Americans and Japanese nonetheless share a deep mutual respect. About two-thirds of Americans trust Japan a great deal or a fair amount and three-quarters of Japanese say they trust the United States, according to a new Pew Research Center survey. Americans are pleased with the current state of U.S.-Japan relations: More than eight-in-ten prefer that ties between the two nations remain as close as they have been in recent years or get closer. But Americans are divided over whether Japan should play a more active military role in the Asia-Pacific region. Even so, twice as many Americans as Japanese think Japan should take on more military responsibilities. As the two nations mark the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II, history continues to frame U.S.-Japan ties. But different incidents over the past seven decades stand out in the American and Japanese consciousness. Americans cite both WWII, and the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan as the most important events in the modern relationship. The Japanese are most likely to name the postwar U.S.-Japan military alliance. Americans believe that Japan has atoned for its actions during WWII. But more than half of Americans, especially those 65 years of age and older, still believe, as they have since 1945, that the U.S. use of nuclear weapons to bomb Hiroshima and Nagasaki was justified. The Japanese strongly disagree. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 12-15, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 and older including 500 cellphone interviews.

Pew Poll: More Approve Than Disapprove of Iran Talks, But Most Think Iranians Are ‘Not Serious’    Monday, March 30, 2015
Ahead of a March 31 deadline for nuclear talks with Iran, more Americans approve (49%) than disapprove (40%) of the United States negotiating directly with Iran over its nuclear program. But the public remains skeptical of whether Iranian leaders are serious about addressing international concerns over their nuclear enrichment program. If a nuclear agreement is reached, most Americans (62%) want Congress to have final authority over the deal. Just 29% say President Obama should have final authority over any nuclear agreement with Iran. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center, conducted March 25-29 among 1,500 adults, finds that just 27% have heard a lot about the nuclear talks between the United States and Iran in Lausanne, Switzerland. Another 49% have heard a little about the negotiations, while 24% have heard nothing at all. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 25-29, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,500 adults age 18 and older including 975 cellphone interviews.

Pew Poll: Federal Tax System Seen in Need of Overhaul    Thursday, March 19, 2015
The public sees the nation’s tax system as deeply flawed: 59% say “there is so much wrong with the federal tax system that Congress should completely change it.” Just 38% think the system “works pretty well” and requires “only minor changes.” These opinions have changed little since 2011. More Are Bothered by Corporations, Wealthy Not Paying Fair Share Than by What They Pay in TaxesWith the April 15 filing deadline approaching, Americans’ top complaint about the tax system is not the amount that they pay in taxes. Rather, it is the feeling that some corporations and wealthy people do not pay their fair share of taxes. Just 27% are bothered “a lot” by the amount they pay in taxes. By contrast, 64% say they are bothered a lot by the feeling that some corporations do not pay their fair share of taxes, and 61% say the same about some wealthy people failing to pay their fair share. In views of other aspects of the tax system, 44% say they are bothered a lot by the complexity of the system, while just 20% are bothered a great deal by the feeling that some poor people are not paying their fair share of taxes. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 18-22, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,504 adults age 18 or older, including 978 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: Public Libraries and Hispanics    Tuesday, March 17, 2015
When it comes to public libraries, immigrant Hispanics pose both a challenge and an opportunity to the library community. On the one hand, this group, which makes up half of the adult U.S. Hispanic population, is less likely than other Americans to have ever visited a U.S. public library and is much less likely to say that they see it as “very easy” to do so. At the same time, Hispanic immigrants who have made their way to a public library stand out as the most appreciative of what libraries have to offer, from free books to research resources to the fact that libraries tend to offer a quiet, safe space. And they are more likely than other groups to say that closing their community library would have a major impact on their family. These are some of the findings of this latest installment of the Pew Research Center’s reporting on the Center’s landmark 2013 Library Services Survey. Seven-in-ten (72%) Latinos ages 16 and older say they have visited a public library or bookmobile in person at one point or another in their lives, the survey shows, a share below that of whites (83%) and blacks (80%). But this finding masks a large difference among Latinos. Fully 83% of U.S.-born Latinos say they have visited a public library at some point in their lives—a share similar to that of whites and blacks. However, among immigrant Latinos, a smaller share—60%—say they have visited a public library or bookmobile in person. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 18-Septmeber 30, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 6,224 Americans, including 739 Hispanics ages 16 and older.

Bankrate Poll: Do you want a big tax refund or bigger paycheck?    Thursday, March 12, 2015
Americans may hate the annual tax-filing season, but they certainly welcome the refunds that are issued each year. In fact, more than half of those who participated in Bankrate's March Money Pulse survey say that they expect to get or have already received their IRS tax refund from the Treasury Department. That's not surprising. The IRS reports that most taxpayers do get money back each year when they file their returns. The desire for a refund is strong at all income levels. More than half of respondents in the Bankrate Money Pulse poll say they prefer tax refunds to breaking even at filing time or owing Uncle Sam a bit. And nearly 4 in 10 (38 percent) of all Americans say they would like a big IRS tax refund. Only 27 percent of Americans say they want to hit that tax sweet spot of not getting a refund, but not owing Uncle Sam any money when they file their 1040 forms. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 26 - March 1, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 and older including 501 cellphone interviews.

Credit Cards Poll: Public lukewarm about paying by cellphone    Monday, March 09, 2015
U.S. consumers are no more interested in paying for purchases using mobile phones than they were six months ago, when Apple unveiled its high-profile pay-by-iPhone technology known as Apple Pay, according to a new poll from CreditCards.com. The poll suggests that even though the number of mobile payments is growing dramatically, with Apple Pay becoming a dominant method, skeptics of paying by phone remain unmoved. In the telephone poll 17 percent of respondents said they would pay for items using a cellphone "always" or "most of the time" if they could. When the same question was asked in September 2014, 13 percent of those answering responded similarly. Those answering "never" or "hardly ever" accounted for 64 percent this time, compared with 62 percent in the fall. This poll's margin of error is 3.6 percentage points. The indifference to mobile payments comes even as Apple, Google and other technology companies continue to push the technology. At an event Monday, Apple CEO Tim Cook said Apple Pay is available at 700,000 locations nationwide, and he detailed plans for the Apple Watch, debuting in April, which will allow wearers to charge items by waving the watch near a payment terminal at a participating retailer. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 5-8, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Far More Interest Among Republicans Than Democrats in Clinton Emails, Netanyahu    Monday, March 09, 2015
From news about the economy to controversy over Hillary Clinton’s emails and the trial of the Boston marathon bomber, no single story dominated the public’s news interest last week. The Week's Top StoriesTwo stories drew far more interest from Republicans than Democrats: 34% of Republicans followed reports about Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email address as secretary of state very closely, compared with just 16% of Democrats. Similarly, about twice as many Republicans (34%) as Democrats (18%) closely followed Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s speech to Congress last Tuesday. Partisan Differences in Interest in Clinton Emails, NetanyahuThere are smaller partisan differences in interest in the week’s other stories. For instance, comparable percentages of Democrats (26%) and Republicans (22%) paid very close attention to arguments at the Supreme Court over the Affordable Care Act; 30% of Democrats and 24% of Republicans very closely followed news about the Department of Justice report on race and policing in Ferguson, Mo. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 5-8, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Most Say Government Policies Since Recession Have Done Little to Help Middle Class, Poor    Wednesday, March 04, 2015
The public makes sharp distinctions about which groups have benefited – and which have not – from the economic policies the government has put in place since the start of the recession. Majorities say that large banks, large corporations and the wealthy have been helped a great deal or a fair amount by government policies. By contrast, 72% say that, in general, the government’s policies since the recession have done little or nothing to help middle class people, and nearly as many say they have provided little or no help for small businesses (68%) and the poor (65%). These opinions have changed little in recent years, and differ only modestly across demographic and income categories. There are significant partisan differences in these views, though majorities of Democrats, Republicans and independents say that government policies following the start of the recession have done little or nothing for the poor and the middle class. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 18-22, 2015 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,504 adults age 18 or older, including 978 cell phone interviews.


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